Bassin Bleu

Bassin Bleu - Basenblé - Blue Basin, Jacmel

Tucked into the mountains 12 km northwest of Jacmel, Bassin Bleu is a series of three cobalt-blue pools linked by waterfalls that make up one of the prettiest swimming holes in Haiti. The three pools are Bassin Clair, Bassin Bleu and Bassin Palmiste. Bassin Clair is the most beautiful of the three, deep into the mountain at the bottom of the waterfall, sheltered and surrounded by smooth rocks draped with maidenhair and creeper ferns.You’re sadly less likely to see the nymphs that, according to legend, live in the grottoes, although be warned that they’ve been known to grab divers attempting to discover the true depth of the pool.  While the mineral-rich waters of Bassin Bleu are a delight at most times of the year, they turn a muddy brown after heavy rainfall.  


Hidden in the hills above the picturesque of one of the most stunning and popular town of Haiti, Jacmel; is the breathtaking, isolated and unique waterfall "Bassin Bleu."  It consists of a series of natural rock bassins arranged in cascade, successively pouring water into one another. The cool and crystal clear water is great for a swim. Jump from the waterfalls, swim in the cool basins, enjoy the cool cover of the lush vegetation in your own private grotto.

Bassin Bleu, Port de Paix

The three pools are Bassin Clair, Bassin Bleu and Bassin Palmiste. Bassin Clair is the most beautiful of the three, deep into the mountain at the bottom of the waterfall, sheltered and surrounded by smooth rocks draped with maidenhair and creeper ferns. (lonely planet) 

Bassin Bleu consists of a series of natural rock bassins arranged in cascade, successively pouring water into one another. The cool and crystal clear water is great for a swim. Jump from the waterfalls, swim in the cool basins, enjoy the cool cover of the lush vegetation in your own private grotto. 

Seau D'Eau

Seau d'Eau "SODO" in Haiti

The area holds cultural significance in Haiti, to both Catholic and Vodou practitioners. In the 19th century, it is believed that the Virgin Mary of Mount Carmel  (or the closely associated Vodou Lwa Erzuli Dantor) appeared on a palm tree there. 


In some accounts, this appearance is said to have occurred during the 1860s.  Another account states that there were two appearances of the Virgin in the 1840s and later in the 1880s.  In Laguerre's detailed account, an apparition of the Virgin Mary first reported in Saut d'Eau on July 16, 1849, by a man reportedly named Fortune Morose.  In numerous oral accounts collected by Laguerre from local people, the young man went away in fear but returned shortly accompanied by a police officer. Together, they found a portrait of the apparition on the leaf of a nearby palm tree. 

Pilgrimage - "Pelerinaj"

Every year,  the falls of Seau D'eau are the site of a large, important religious pilgrimage, during the festival of Our Lady of Carmel, from July 14–16.  A Eucharistic rite is held during the festival, as well as various vodou rituals, but the penultimate devotional activity is bathing in the waters of the falls, and asking favors of the Virgin or Erzulie. The water is also sacred to the lwa Damballah and Ayida Wedo.

  • Located near Mirebalais and 60 miles north of Port au Prince, the falls became a holy place after it became widely believed that the Virgin Mary had appeared nearby on a palm tree. The palm tree was chopped down by a French priest who was rightly concerned that the cultural significance of the tree would foster a large amount of superstition, but the action was futile, and the area itself became sacred, despite his efforts.

Day of Celebration

The pilgrimage has been described as an excellent "example of the syncretic nature of Haitian religious life. In Ville-Bonheur there is a Mass, and the church's statue of the Virgin is paraded around town, while at the falls there are Vodou baptisms and ceremonies.... Ville-Bonheur throngs with people who happily attend both religious gatherings" 

  • For over a century, Haitians have trekked in from miles around, even more so since the catastrophic 2010 earthquake, to ask the Virgin Mary (or the closely associated Vodou Lwa, Erzulie Dantor) for her blessings. The sick and the needy let the water of the falls wash over them as they perform various rituals of both Voodoo and Catholicism in a religious festival that lasts for three days..